Western Ayurveda

What do we do when we turn everything into making money? What happens when we turn stuff into sales of products or services? The allopathic model is that you take a drug for a symptom of something that is ailing. It actually cannot even see what it is that has caused the ailing, ever. This same mindset is the Western mindset, the paradigm.

Nothing about Ayurveda is this. Nothing at all. But most people do not know a difference or even know what Ayurveda is.

Nothing below in this picture is ayurveda as well. Its actually a shame.

Please do not support such a world. Notice where you too buy into this stuff with products etc. go on a diet of that world. There is no yoga pants or crystals or audio of a certain brainwave that is going to do anything but upset the natural rhythms that you need to find to actually be healthy in your life. There is no living a completely disconnected life and taking a pill to be connected. Although this IS the western way. It doesn’t work.

As for this below, since everyone has a balance and an imbalance and i guarantee that the practitioner of this below does not know anything about diagnosis, since every location also has its environmental effects or balance of gunas, and since the seasonal changes also have their effects……. can you see how a menu like this is complete absurdity?

 

 

I mean seriously, I really do not have words when I look at this……..

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Maybe a couple letters like BS would suffice?

 

 

“New Age Ayurveda”

Several paradigms of Ayurveda unique to Western practice have emerged over the past few decades, but perhaps the most pervasive paradigm imprinted in the mind of the American public is a form of practice termed “New Age Ayurveda.”[4] Although the New Age movement slowly died out in past decades, many of its core ideologies have begun to resurface in recent years, bringing along with it a revival of sorts for a new form of Ayurveda. The earliest successful promoters of Ayurveda in America included individuals like Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, Deepak Chopra, Vasant Lad, David Frawley, etc.; who sought to popularize their particular varieties of Ayurvedic practices to a larger audience. These varieties of Ayurveda all share a common acceptance of New Age beliefs and incorporate many of these beliefs into their practices.[1] Zysk (2001) identifies four particular characteristics unique to New Age Ayurveda in America in particular: linking Ayurveda to Indian spirituality (using yoga in particular), depicting Ayurveda as ancient beyond evidence, calling Ayurveda the foundation of mind-body medicine, and trying to use Western scientific principles to prove that Ayurveda is legitimate and more effective than biomedicine.[4] Such forms also tend to make extensive, broad claims about efficacy and “correctness” that directly contradicts even the writings of classical texts. New Age Ayurveda often claims to be without side effects, that natural remedies can provide great benefit without any detriment to other aspects of health. Classical Ayurveda distinctly refutes this by warning that prescribing inappropriate remedies or misdiagnosing a malady can result in illness.[4] Classical Ayurveda also employs methods such as surgery for various diseases (such as cancer)[5][6] along with rational therapies for understanding and healing the mind, which are often ignored or even refuted in New Age Ayurveda against the classical opinion[7]

Classical or Traditional Ayurveda in India also has no references to such techniques as Reiki, Pranic Healing and Chakra-balancing that are being practiced as part of modern-day American Ayurveda, either. While techniques such as Pranayama were employed in Yogic healing, these systems dramatically differ from the “faith healing” techniques in New Age Ayurveda circles. While traditional Tantric Ayurveda did employ these practices, they were more in-depth and elaborate systems that required several decades of study and practice by sadhaks or spiritual adepts.

Ayurveda has experienced many historically or academically inconsistent portrayals as a five- to eight-thousand-year-old practice,[8] as a direct descendant of the Vedic medicine, as a Tantric tradition, etc.[2] For any particular version of New Age Ayurveda, one or more of these claims are made as a method to increase authenticity (no matter how misleading), and therefore also popularity and recognition.[9] Even these small controversies have caused a general rift between the scientific or academic communities and Ayurveda practitioners, resulting in a general disgust with and misconceptions about the whole medical system. Modern American practices have appropriated authentic practices so drastically that Western Ayurveda has taken a form of “wellness and self-help culture” which scholars and academics critically view as the commoditization of a deep and complex tradition.[1]

 

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10 thoughts on “Western Ayurveda

  1. And please do not take that as a criticism of you or anything, it is not meant at all as that but rather the perfect example of what Ayurveda is understood as in the western world as well as what it is being taught as.

    • I totally understand what you are saying, and agree. But for the ones who come back and say well they’ve had great results and are feeling good, so their teacher gave them very good advice, then I have nothing to say to that. The teacher is not an ayurvedic healer, but just an overall medical intuitive, with traditional chinese medicine background, and herbology and nutrition…

      • All I can say is to quote charaka samhita by saying everything is Amrita in the hands of the wise and poison in the hands of the ignorant. My experience and study of Ayurveda shows me that to put something out to a class like that is not wise. Specially if someone is an intuitive, which my teacher makes jokes at all the time about how every American thinks they are an intuitive yet they cannot explain the science. I steer very clear from those people and I advise others too as well. This to from my experience. I have a long term friend/student/client that does not work with me with Ayurveda as she has her healer that she has been working with for years. She swears by her but I can tell you from proper diagnosis over the many years that the lady is killing her with all the ridiculous, and I do mean ridiculous, things she is having her do. Not that the excessive bloating and gas that would make an entire football stadium exit for fresh air would not be a simple clue, but that too is made into just one more thing she is fighting in the long list of parasites, bacterial and whatnot. The latest is that she now has Lyme disease caught by a mosquito bite so her healer tells her. This is not a rare experience of mine. It is very regular in America. I can only explain what I see from proper diagnosis and knowledge. It is pretty horrific to see what is being said in the name of Ayurveda as well as intuitive healers etc… The lack of proper education does not help. I ask you this, if the minimum education in India is the BAMS, why is anything less okay in a totally different culture with a totally different paradigm that needs to not only be taught but also understood and lived in the education? I will also add that here in India I have had some fun in showing doctors what is being taught as Ayurveda there and watching their reactions. Just did this yesterday playing Dr (a famous western Ayurveda writer and lecturer that everyone knows) audio to a doctor where he explained the time of the clock if the doshas and the doctor looked at me and said , “what is he talking about?” I was thinking of just doing a whole series of videos of this stuff since I have a ton of audios and posting them since I know it has to be difficult to discern anything there. How is one to know? The actual texts are not being taught. The level of BANS is not being taught in any fashion. What does that leave?

  2. I’m not sure whether this is a good place to ask, but recently I’ve heard a teacher say that we should all be eating papaya seeds. To get fresh seeds and mash them and eat a little bit everyday, as its properties are amazing for the body. Is this a good thing to do?

    • perfect place to ask. No. Not everyone should be eating papaya seeds. Just as much as “everyone” should be taking triphala or anything else really. The teacher is following Western nutritional pop fads. This is just another. Did you ask why? What are the reasons behind it? Why would it be good for everyone? Ayurveda does not work like this. Thank you though for the very good example of Western ayurveda though. Find out the reason(s) why and please post them back here and lets analyze why someone would say that as well as who could be and why someone would not want to. Thx for your comment.
      Another thing you can do is google it and see that what the teacher says is most likely exactly what you are finding on the internet written in western terms, not ayurvedic.
      Bottom line is that you are an individual and everything is based upon that and the environment and time you are living in. another question to just go deeper, are papayas local to where you live? If not, just another reason.

      • Papaya seeds being touted for clearing of parasites and specially for liver help. And that is why the teacher said this is a great natural resource to help with the liver. Couple of the students tried and said they’ve had great results and feel they have better digestion, less liver congestion and also with the parasites. And to answer to your question papayas are not local to where we live.

      • So as I said before about it being western Ayurveda, please explain how anything of what was just written has to do with Ayurveda?

      • I realize it’s not anything to do with true Ayurveda, but even if it’s western Ayurveda and it looks like it has helped a few of those students who tried it and had good results does it matter? Or are you saying, that the results they’ve had may just be temporary, or may have effects later on that are not too good as they didn’t follow all the principles?

      • So I will try to explain this as comprehensible as I can, what diagnostic basis is one seeing that it has helped a few students? The knowledge is not there in the first place to discern whether one should be taking this or anything else anyway, right? So by what rights is it helping? They feel like it helped is not Ayurveda not is it science. Or let me take it further and try to explain that simply taking something alters and has its effects. Always. Did those students have digestive disorders or liver issues that were diagnosed properly to be give that advise? That is Ayurveda. What season was it? All of this is really really deep and why I have this blog in the first place because I see only what you are explaining out there and it simply is not Ayurveda at all. Is it harmful? Yes, it can be. Everything has side effects. Ayurveda as well. And the same way that one does not have the education to know the diagnosis to take day papaya seeds(which I am not saying do not work for certain things, they can), that same person does not have the education or diagnosis to say it has helped or even more important that it has harmed. Get the point. A little bit of information is extremely dangerous. Specially in the hands of the uneducated and excited to go out and help the world. Dr. Lad has stated that everyone should take triphala and not one of his students that I have asked knows the contraindications to triphala. Yet I have taken several people off of triphala because their imbalance is being worse… They are creating a deeper disease by taking it. I can name off many things like this. Unfortunately, the education in the west of Ayurveda is pitiful at best. This added to the materialistic nature of the western world has damaged Ayurveda, not helped it, this too is the outcome of what you have explained.
        Can you see?

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